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20130124
20130201
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CSPAN
Jan 29, 2013 6:00am EST
noncombat taxes -- b combat taxes, why did you choose to do that in libya and not choose -- or choose to not do that in other places? each circumstance, of course, is significantly different. and it has to be measured on its own merits. it also addresses, i think, the limits of power. military power does not solve all problems. and importantly in libya, there was aup security council resolution -- a u.n. security council resolution that called for this mission and authorized all available means. in syria there is no such security council resolution that would, that would provide the legal underpinning for an operation in syria similar to what was conducted in libya. so it's a great question, but there are significant differences, i think. i should caveat all of that by reminding all that syria's not in my region, so i'm a long, long way from a syrian expert. but as an interested observer, that's kind of how i see the difference. >> thank you, dr. scott and yen. my name is melvin foote, i'm a member of an organization called the constituency for africa, we work on public policy here in
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 6:00am EST
they are paying today. and yet, you know, that's not a statement that should increase taxes on gasoline. it's incredibly regressive. considered in policy hearings and talk about how it's very a clear signal to the market to increase the price of gasoline, if that's what you're trying to reduce. but it really -- when you see spikes in the price of gasoline and people interviewed on the news and they have a lifestyle, jobs to get to, and commitments that are made, and they've got a huge impact to their life by these high
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2